Most Effective Forms of Propaganda

Satire
Not all propaganda is bad, but all of it does follow a select criteria:

1. It must attempt to make an influence. No matter the output's size, if it attempts it, it's propaganda.

1a. If influence is successful, there will be opposition that arises against support.

1b. There will be echo chambers to make both beliefs stand out as a result of that.

1c. Other sects of each belief will arise from that as well as a result. And echo chambers will be made for them as well, no matter how big or small.

2. It works towards a select goal or goals. Although not all political, politics is where it mostly shines. Other examples of this include clickbait (works towards a goal of profit through deceptive or intriguing means) and pop culture (exemplifies what it feels is "trendy" through manufactured (or made with heavy corporate influence) songs, films, anime, TV shows, etc; and whatever stems from that helps boost that trend to the forefront). While some aspects of it are bad, it's ultimately harmless in the long run. Of course, it can have the opposite effect as well, as goes for all forms of propaganda.

3. It must make something stand out. Whether it be an opponent, idea, figure, or anything that is relevant to making the propaganda effective, if something is emphasized repeatedly ad nauseaum, it's propaganda.

4. It doesn't have to be big things. Sometimes propaganda can be subtle, be invisible to the public eye, taken to the comfort of the home.

5. There must be something in the propaganda that has the potential to mislead the audience. Of course, exceptions to this include propaganda in which it's discussing shouldn't be taken at face value, but rather instead be related to the emotional aspects of the situation, in which that point is invalid. Examples of this include, most famously, the Gettysburg Address and

A common misconception is that echo chambers spread propaganda. While true for some, it is not true in general aspects. Scientific evidence, for example, is true based on our common knowledge, and as thus, the community surrounding it isn't necessarily spreading propaganda through that method. You can say they're being arrogant about it, but that's not really spreading propaganda.

And finally, this is the most effective forms of propaganda, and nothing else. Usage is irrelevant, we're talking about quality here. And as a side note, this is propaganda, but it's not meant to do anything else but show the effectiveness of it.

And hey, if it becomes popular it's bound to further prove its point.

Also, I don't like talking about this at this length so this is the only list I'll provide on the matter.

The Top Ten

1 Appeal to Emotion

It speaks for itself, but four examples I think make it the most effective, and the most complex form of propaganda are below.

But the gist is that it can work in many ways some forms can't. It laps around techniques like Ad Nauseam and Labeling so much that they aren't even done with their first lap, not even a quarter of the way through. It's absolutely potent when used right, yet only fatal at its weakest. - Satire

2 Selective Wording

Stemming from emotional appeal, this is just one of the four variants I will be talking about.
Note the words said by Donald J. Trump in his most recent tweet. A heartless man, sure, but he's been doing this for a long time.

" “Russians had no compromising information on Donald Trump” @FoxNews Of course not, because there is none, and never was. This whole Witch Hunt is an illegal disgrace...and Obama did nothing about Russia! "

He's spreading the idea that he's in the right, that he's the saintly President. Of course, I could care less about Russia's ties with the U.S, that's been emphasized so much that I've just grown numb to it. The point is that "he's innocent", as he's been saying. He shifts the blame to Obama, as he's always done. He calls it a Witch Hunt, yet put innocent rapists on the hot seat when only allegations were released. His usage of words like "never" and "none" not only show that he claims that the ties don't exist, but based on repetition ad ...more - Satire

3 Cult of Personality

"Make America Great Again"

I promise this isn't a hate-Trump list, but this is a popular example of the technique. The quote is spread through the idea that he can do it. He can clean up America and replenish it to its former glory. He's the guy to do it, and he wants to help. This leads to guys praising him like a god, wearing their MAGA hats like Christians wear their crucifix around their neck. To go further, Scientology is a cult that promotes the idea of knowledge. Although extreme, one thing the cult can do is harm others in the name of the idea or figure. Does that mean that the idea or figure is bad? No, not at all. In fact, it further makes the name "cult of personality" more accurate of the name because they're the one's doing it. Not the idea or the figure (although in some cases the figure does it).

Tolerate the idea but push away the force, I say. Keep away from extremists and maybe they'll rot away on the streets of whatever rural or remote setting they're ...more - Satire

A personality cult is intended to replace RELIGION, and it's associated with state atheism. For example, the Nazis protrayed Hitler as a GOD in his cult. ABSOLUTELY stupid, but it works because it basically brainwashes the people.

4 False Accusations

Again, an emotional appeal. Like the others, it bases it off of what you feel about the situation in a historical and legal manner. For example, a guy gets falsely accused of rape by a female. Naturally, based on history and legal manners, we get support for the victim, no matter if it's true or false. For the "rapist", we get harassment, threats, and sometimes even a psychological breakdown from him, no matter if it's true or false. Likewise, a completely guilty rapist might accuse the victim of lying which leads to backlash against her.

When it's put at the forefront, well, people anyway, you're inclined to believe them even more. If it's a footer, you ignore it because it's insignificant. The most effective propaganda stems off from what is mostly in front of you, and that's just how it is. Whether it's already there or you yourself put it there, that's how it will shape ideas. - Satire

5 Transfer

Basically, you project an idea on a guy that has either negative or positive connotations to make that idea one of those qualities. No matter if it's good or bad in nature, it's twisting emotion to get its way. - Satire

6 Ad Nauseam

This is my de-facto #2 spot, so don't get confused by it's replacement at #2. Sometimes, propaganda doesn't need opposition. If they can make people apathetic to it, there'll be nothing to stop it from holding ground. An example of this is 9/11. Some people think it's a travesty, true, but that's less and less each day. You get memes made from the event, and each day we honor the lost we get more and more people expressing apathy and just ticking it off as another checkbox.

That's kind of appeal to fear, but it's still valid in this point as well. - Satire

7 Cherry Picking

Of course, it's lower on the list due to constraints, but this can kill a celebrities career no matter how decent of a person they are. For example, Justin Bieber is reviled on this site, but only for a few general statements and one actually horrible incident. But since it's taken out of many incidents and given attention, it has the opportunity to convince people that it is correct, even if it's not. And in Bieber's case, it's kind of overblown. Immaturity or not, it's picking out a few scenarios to generalize him, and that's propaganda.

Fits into Ad Nauseam as well if it's repeated endlessly. - Satire

8 Half-truth

Sometimes, the truth may be being told, but it has lies around it, whether included or. I like to refer to Hillary Clinton for this one.

" "Our constitutional democracy enshrines the peaceful transfer of power and we don't just respect that, we cherish it. It also enshrines other things. The rule of law, the principle that we are all equal in rights and dignity, freedom of worship and expression. We respect and cherish these values, too, and we must defend them. ""

Yeah, that's truthful in some aspects, but it doesn't help that she was all for a recount. She wasn't the loudest voice from the elections, but she did appeal to the loudest voice in pop culture. Trump loses, no recount. Even if there was meddling with Russia. But he won, and there was call for a recount. And that kind of goes against the equal rights thing, at least in terms of the electoral college votes. - Satire

9 Straw Man

See for yourself. A conversation between Neil deGrasse Tyson and a guy on Twitter.

" A subject is scientifically controversial when actively debated by legions of scientists, not when actively debated by the public, the press, or by politicians."

" Lets not forget that most scientist get funding/rely on it which leads to inherent bias. We trust our scientists to be truthful but there is no recognition for fact-checking in the scientific community now is there? "

It misinterprets the position to make the argument easier, and as such, is more convincing. A vast majority of it is done via dishonest practice. And as a result, the influence can go to both extremes. Some may blow it off, but others will follow that idea. But on its own, if it's truthful, it's technically not malicious. So that's why I think it's deserving of a lower spot on the list. - Satire

10 Scapegoating

You place blame on others for your own actions? You want to distract from the problem at hand? Congratulations, that's called Scapegoating 101. An effective way to promote an idea from the gutter, but on its own it's not worth ranking any higher. - Satire

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