Top Ten Plant and Animal Species that Would Be Invasive in California

DinoLover4242
This list is for invasive species (plant and animal) that aren't present in California, but would of would have had a severe impact to California's economy, society, and/or ecology, it can also include some unlikely invasive species that would be invasive too. Have fun posting invasive and possibly invasive species to the list!

The Top Ten

1 Cane Toad Cane Toad

Australia is currently having problems with these large, fat, warty toads. These toads are proven to do well even in the harshest of California's climates, so these toads could become the next invasive species in California. - DinoLover4242

2 Red-Necked Wallaby Red-Necked Wallaby

Some species of wallabies such as red-necked wallabies are flourishing well even in Great Britain, where there are lots of predators, and they also flourish even if it's cold, but they would also pose a risk to natives there, and they would also do the same in California, overgrazing the lands, outcompeting native rabbits and other small herbivores, and other impact they would have. - DinoLover4242

3 Gray Kangaroo Gray Kangaroo The kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae. In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, especially those of the genus Macropus: the red kangaroo, antilopine kangaroo, eastern grey kangaroo, and western grey kangaroo.

Some people planned to introduce kangaroos (gray and/or red kangaroos, but let's just use gray kangaroo as an example), into Colorado, but fortunately, it was just an April fools joke, but what if this happened? The kangaroos would have overgrazed lands, outcompete native deer, and would have almost no predators, less predators than in their native range, which would have allowed these kangaroos to expand their population out of control. The same would be said for California, which is very similar to Australia's lands. - DinoLover4242

4 Koala Koala The koala is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae and its closest living relatives are the wombats.

Even though this is unlikely, this is still possible as California has lots of eucalyptus trees, which would (have) allow these near-endangered marsupials to flourish in California, and another positive thing for koalas in California is that California's climate is similar to Australia's climate, which would make matters worse for eucalyptus tree farmers, as they eat eucalyptus trees, so yes, koalas would thrive in California. - DinoLover4242

5 Common Brushtail Possum Common Brushtail Possum

New Zealand is currently having problems with these invasive marsupials, as they eat the eggs of birds, and they also eat crops. Unfortunately for California, parts of California is similar to New Zealand in climate, not only similar to Australia, so this would allow these marsupials to flourish and become invasive species in California. - DinoLover4242

6 Tasmanian Devil Tasmanian Devil

As some evidence confirms, in their native range, introduced foxes in Tasmania had been killed off by Tasmanian devils due to the fox pups were unprotected against Tasmanian devil attacks. Sadly for Californians, many parts of California is similar to Tasmania, which would allow Tasmanian devils to flourish (if devil face tumors [which are currently threatening native ones in Tasmania] aren't present in invasive ones), they would also kill off native foxes and even coyotes into extinction, they would also kill off some native prey species. - DinoLover4242

7 Rhesus Macaque Rhesus Macaque

These monkeys flourish well in both dry and wet habitats, they also adapt well into life in the city, but they were also introduced to Florida and South Carolina, where they are proven to be flourishing. If rhesus macaques were introduced to California's ecosystem, they would impact some native birds and small mammals, but they would also spread some harmful diseases as Floida's rhesus macaques shows. - DinoLover4242

8 Red Kangaroo Red Kangaroo

Some people planned to introduce kangaroos (gray and/or red kangaroos, but let's just use red kangaroo as an example), into Colorado, but fortunately, it was just an April fools joke, but what if this happened? The kangaroos would have overgrazed lands, outcompete native deer, and would have almost no predators, less predators than in their native range, which would have allowed these kangaroos to expand their population out of control. The same would be said for California, which is very similar to Australia's lands. - DinoLover4242

9 Vervet Monkey Vervet Monkey

These monkeys already flourish in nonnative Florida, and they do well in native African ranges, where it can get either wet or dry. Vervet monkeys also adapt well to city life, so these monkeys would have no problem adjusting to city life in California. Unlike rhesus macaques, vervet monkeys in Florida aren't known to spread much harmful diseases, so vervet monkeys would be more tolerate by the people of California, despite vervet monkey's possible ecological impact towards some native species. - DinoLover4242

10 Polynesian Rat Polynesian Rat

We already have brown and black rats, but these rats in where brown and black rats were brought to, they still flourish and their population is growing due to grains and other food sources that humans let out. The Polynesian rats would also thrive in California if they were brought to California. - DinoLover4242

The Contenders

11 Nine-Banded Armadillo Nine-Banded Armadillo

These armadillos are flourishing well in southeastern United States, where they cause some ecological impact, since these armadillos weren't native to North America. Fortunately for California, there is a range of mountains that blocks the armadillos from coming into California, but it these mountains were removed or if these armadillos were brought into California by some people, the armadillos would have caused some ecological impact towards some native California animals by eating their eggs or preying on them. - DinoLover4242

12 Vampire Bat Vampire Bat

The common vampire bat is a potential invasive species that, if global warming trends continues in the future, would spread into California, spreading potential deadly diseases on livestock on many people, even if there are few diseased vampire bats. Southern California is the warmest part of California for now and would provide suitable habitats for vampire bats and would spread out if California continues to warm. - DinoLover4242

13 Flying Fox Flying Fox

Flying foxes are already listed on the Lacey Act since people are worried that flying foxes would devastate agricultural crops by eating the crops. If this happened, that would probably be a disaster. They would probably also spread annoying and possibly deadly diseases and/or viruses if they were carrying them before being released into the new ecosystem. Imagine if flying foxes were successfully introduced to California and are flourishing (breeding, finding right food, etc) in Californian wilderness, cities, and suburbs, that horrifying scenario would happen in this state. - DinoLover4242

14 Coquerel's Sifaka Coquerel's Sifaka

This species of lemur becoming invasive in California may sound unlikely, but it's possible due to the fact that many (not all, though) zoos, safari parks, and sanctuaries in California have Coquerel's sifakas, and if enough Coquerel's sifakas escaped, they could establish breeding populations in California, where they could probably outcompete native squirrels and other omnivorous tree-dwelling animals to endangerment or extinction - DinoLover4242

15 Indri Indri
16 Common Bamboo Common Bamboo

This species of bamboo would spread out of control in California's ecosystem if left unchecked, outcompeting some of the native plants of California. These bamboo would have no natural predators other than humans, but if the humans couldn't get rid of these invasive bamboos (if they reproduce fast and frequently, more so than in their native Chinese range), there would be nothing left to do to control these invasive bamboo but to introduce giant panda bears and red pandas, which would have predators like cougars, etc to control panda populations, yet enough pandas to control the spread of bamboo. - DinoLover4242

17 Ring-Tailed Lemur Ring-Tailed Lemur

This species of lemur becoming invasive in California may sound unlikely, but it's possible due to the fact that many (not all, though) zoos, safari parks, and sanctuaries in California have ring-tailed lemurs, and if enough ring-tailed lemurs escaped, they could establish breeding populations in California, where they could probably outcompete native squirrels and other omnivorous tree-dwelling animals to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

18 Aye-aye Aye-aye The aye-aye is a lemur, a strepsirrhine primate native to Madagascar that combines rodent-like teeth that perpetually grow and a special thin middle finger.

Aye-ayes are a yet-another unlikely but possible invasive species if let loose in California. If they were brought into California's ecosystem, they could devastate some native insect species and outcompete many native woodpecker species to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

19 Red Ruffed Lemur Red Ruffed Lemur

This species of lemur becoming invasive in California may sound unlikely, but it's possible due to the fact that many (not all, though) zoos, safari parks, and sanctuaries in California have red ruffed lemurs, and if enough red ruffed lemurs escaped, they could establish breeding populations in California, where they could probably outcompete native squirrels and other omnivorous tree-dwelling animals to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

20 Black-And-White Ruffed Lemur Black-And-White Ruffed Lemur

This species of lemur becoming invasive in California may sound unlikely, but it's possible due to the fact that many (not all, though) zoos, safari parks, and sanctuaries in California have black-and-white ruffed lemurs, and if enough black-and-white ruffed lemurs escaped, they could establish breeding populations in California, where they could probably outcompete native squirrels and other omnivorous tree-dwelling animals to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

21 Meerkat Meerkat The meerkat or suricate is a small carnivoran belonging to the mongoose family. It is the only member of the genus Suricata.

Meerkats would outcompete some/many native populations of different species of ground squirrels, weasels, etc if meerkats were introduced to California. Meerkats would also overrun California and would flourish due to much less predators than in their native South African range, causing population explosion like what happened to European rabbits in nonnative Australia. Some species of endangered scorpions, snakes, and lizards would probably become extinct due to the invasive of meerkats in California. - DinoLover4242

22 Small Asian Mongoose Small Asian Mongoose

They're already invasive in many islands such as Hawaii, so it's possible for small Asian mongooses to become invasive species if they were introduced to California as exotic pets and/or zoo/safari park escapees. They're already on the Lacey Act along with flying foxes, but some people can break some laws without other people noticing, so it's still possible for small Asian mongooses to be released in California to become invasive, eating eggs of native ground reptiles and birds, as well as preying on native reptiles, amphibians, and small mammals, possibly driving some endangered species to extinction. - DinoLover4242

23 Komodo Dragon Komodo Dragon The Komodo dragon, also known as the Komodo monitor, is a large species of lizard found in the Indonesian islands of Komodo, Rinca, Flores, Gili Motang, and Padar.

Komodo dragons do really well even with (most) invasive species in its native range, and since California has similar climate and (most) habitats, Komodo dragons would flourish really well in most parts of California. Komodo dragons would be a threat to not only California's farmed livestock, but also to native deer and such, probably making some endangered or even extinct, so it's a risk to introduce Komodo dragons into California, where they would most likely become invasive species. - DinoLover4242

24 American Alligator American Alligator

This species of alligator is one of the only native species of crocodilians of mainland North America (along with the near-endangered American crocodiles in South Florida). Despite this, they are only native to southeastern United States, but if they were introduced to California, they would flourish, as in their native range, alligators are known to tolerate cold temperatures and one time, people recorded alligators hibernating underneath a frozen lake with their snouts sticking out to get oxygen while they hibernate. There were also reports of pet alligators that either escaped or were let loose by humans, so it's possible for alligators to survive and flourish in California wilderness, however, alligators would negatively impact some native species, therefore rendering those species either endangered or extinct from California's alligator invasion, unlike in Florida where Burmese pythons devastate some alligator populations, in California, there are no pythons, allowing alligators ...more - DinoLover4242

25 Alligator Snapping Turtle Alligator Snapping Turtle

There are some common snapping turtles in nonnative range like California, but what about alligator snapping turtles, which aren't (yet) present in California? Just like the common snapping turtles, the alligator snapping turtles would probably adapt to California's climate and would severely impact native small reptiles, amphibians, and fiwh by eating their eggs, by outcompeting them, and by preying on the ones that couldn't run/swim fast enough. Because alligator snapping turtles are larger and stronger than common snapping turtles, alligator snapping turtles would consume more prey items, rendering some species of fish, amphibians, and/or reptiles endangered or extinct. - DinoLover4242

26 Kudzu Kudzu

Kudzu are already devastating man-made suburbs in southeastern United States, and regrows after dying, so it's possible for kudzu to flourish in California if they were introduced there by either birds spreading outwards closer to California or if humans brought kudzu and/or their seeds to California gardens or wilderness. There, the kudzu would wreck California neighborhoods too by overgrowing and covering man-made objects such as houses, causing some damages. - DinoLover4242

27 African Bullfrog African Bullfrog

African bullfrogs are a good candidates as being invasive species, since California has a similar climate to the African bullfrog's native range, and African bullfrogs mature much faster than American bullfrogs due to the fact that African bullfrogs live in drier climates. They would also outcompete and prey on native frogs, they would flourish despite competition from another nonnative frog, the American bullfrogs, which also aren't native to California. - DinoLover4242

28 Australian Magpie Australian Magpie

These birds, which aren't magpies or even corvids (despite their names), but part of a completely different group of passerine birds, would be highly invasive if they were introduced to California. Australian magpies do really well in nonnative New Zealand, where they displaced some native birds and tolerate colder temperatures, so this proves that Australian magpies would flourish really well in California too. - DinoLover4242

29 Screaming Piha Screaming Piha

This may sound unlikely, but thanks to people making lots of gardens and other humid habitats in many parts of California, and the fact that California is becoming warmer over many years, it is creating more suitable habitats for rainforest birds, including screaming pihas. If screaming pihas were introduced to California, they would outcompete some native birds to endangerment or extinction as screaming pihas feed on fruits (possibly also ones present in California) and insects (also probably also the ones in California too). - DinoLover4242

30 Montezuma Oropendola Montezuma Oropendola

It is a possible invasive species as it could invade California thanks to expansion of humid gardens and other similar habitats and the fact that California is becoming warmer over years, and if they successfully established breeding populations in California, they would outcompete some native birds including the now-near-threatened yellow-billed magpie to endangerment or extinction, as Montezuma oropendola also feeds on small vertebrates, insects, and plants, even feeding on bananas, so they would be viewed as conservation pests by Californians and would also be an agricultural pest due to having banana in their diet. - DinoLover4242

31 Capuchinbird Capuchinbird

Just like the screaming piha and the Montezuma oropendola, the capuchinbird may sound unlikely to become invasive species in California, but thanks to global warming and humans making suitable habitats including humid gardens, etc for rainforest birds, it is becoming more and more possible for rainforest birds to establish breeding populations in California, and the capuchinbird may outcompete some native birds including some species of blackbirds by feeding on the native insects, they also feed on fruits, which may also include agricultural fruits, so they would be an agricultural pest to farmer's fruits. - DinoLover4242

32 White-Faced Whistling Duck White-Faced Whistling Duck

It may sound unlikely as white-faced whistling ducks can get frostbite, but due to global warming and artificial lakes and rivers made by humans, these birds may flourish well in California, probably outcompeting with native wood ducks and other small native waterfowls. - DinoLover4242

33 Grey Go-Away-Bird Grey Go-Away-Bird

It might be strange to think that grey go-away-birds could become successful invasive species in California, but as South Africa shows, where it can get chilly, grey go-away-birds show resistance to the cold, and in most of their native range, they feed on leaves, flowers, buds, fruits, even eating invasive plants not native to the bird's range (mostly) without ill effects, they also feed on termites and snails, which would be an advantage especially if they're introduced to California after zoo escapees or if released by humans. They might help control the spread of invasive mud snails and non-native termites, but they would outcompete some native birds and would overhunt native insects and snails, and would also be agricultural pests as they feed on plants, probably also ones farmed by humans in California. - DinoLover4242

34 Superb Lyrebird Superb Lyrebird

This species of birds, native to mainland Australia, has already been introduced to Tasmania, where they flourish despite Tasmania being typically cooler than mainland Australia (in most ways), so they would likely do the same in California, where they would be invasive as their foraging behavior that changes structures on the forest floor would damage the environment in California, since there are no native birds with this behavior in California, and this would be bad news for some native birds, as lyrebirds eat the insects, possibly also native ones in California (probably also nonnative ones too). - DinoLover4242

35 Eastern Spinebill Eastern Spinebill

This Australian bird adapts really well in human settlements in native range, so there's no reason for them not adapting to human settlements in nonnative range, including California, which is becoming warmer due to climate change, and the fact that there are lots of gardens made by humans, which would provide nectar from plants for nonnative Australian spinebills. The spinebills would also eat the nectar of invasive plants, thus spreading the invasive plants even further, and the fact that spinebills feed on nectar, they would outcompete native hummingbirds to endangerment or extinction due to the invasion of spinebills. - DinoLover4242

36 Fire Ant Fire Ant

These ants are already a concern for many Californians and are likely to be introduced to California as lots of law breakers are out in California, with some possibly wanting to bring fire ants in California despite fire ants being not native to California. There, fire ants would likely kill off lots of small endangered species to extinction, and make some small animals endangered or close to being endangered. - DinoLover4242

37 Wild Swan Goose Wild Swan Goose

These birds may be listed as Vulnerable in their native range, but these (pure) wild birds flourish well in nonnative Europe and is likely to become established in Florida, so this makes their successful breeding populations also possible in California, where it is becoming warmer, but that might not effect the wild swan geese much in California as the wild swan geese in captivity including San Diego Zoo Safari Park, they tolerate warmer temperatures really well, so wild swan geese would be able to adapt to warming temperatures. There, they would outcompete some native geese and possibly interbreed with some wild geese and/or domestic geese, most likely domestic swan geese, if there's more wild swan geese than domestic swan geese, interbreeding with them most likely erase all traces of domestication and would more likely spread out and overconsuming native grass. - DinoLover4242

38 Flamingo Flamingo Flamingos or flamingoes are a type of wading bird in the genus Phoenicopterus, the only genus in the family Phoenicopteridae.

It may sound unlikely, but there are lots of brine lakes and rivers of California, where there are lots of threatened and endangered species that are declining due to human activities. If successfully introduced and breeding naturally without human help, flamingos in California would make matters worse for native brine-dwelling species by feeding on them. - DinoLover4242

39 Emu Emu The emu is the second-largest living bird by height, after its ratite relative, the ostrich. It is endemic to Australia where it is the largest native bird and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius.

Emus flourish really well even in cold climates in some farms, probably also breeding well there as well. If this is the case, emus would flourish well in California, but would threaten some native species by competing them for insects and other small animals they feed on, as well as feeding on plants that some native species depend on. - DinoLover4242

40 Ostrich Ostrich The ostrich or common ostrich is either of two species of large flightless birds native to Africa, the only living member of the genus Struthio, which is in the ratite family. In 2014, the Somali ostrich was recognized as a distinct species.

South African ostriches (a subspecies of ostrich) flourish really well even in cold climates in South Africa and some farms, probably also breeding well there as well. If this is the case, South African ostriches would flourish well in California, but would threaten some native species by competing them for insects and other small animals they feed on, as well as feeding on plants that some native species depend on. - DinoLover4242

41 Streaked Tenrec Streaked Tenrec

It may sound unlikely for this species to successfully establish breeding populations in California, but due to global warming causing California to warm up and humid habitats like gardens being built by humans, this increased the likelihood of streaked tenrecs being introduced successfully in California and breeding without any human help. But if that occurs, streaked tenrecs would likely kill off some native insects and earthworms to endangerment or extinction as streaked tenrecs feed on insects and earthworms. - DinoLover4242

42 Guinea Pig Guinea Pig The guinea pig, also called the cavy or domestic guinea pig, is a species of rodent belonging to the family Caviidae and the genus Cavia.

There are lots of guinea pigs, a group of medium-sized tailless rodents, as pets throughout California, so it is possible for some people not wanting guinea pigs anymore and release them into the wilderness, thus making guinea pigs possibly invasive species, after they adapt to native predators, and rodents of most kinds breed really fast, so the guinea pigs would have enough time to adapt to California's ecosystem. They, however, would outcompete some native small mammals. - DinoLover4242

43 Hamster Hamster

This may seem silly, but hamsters are NOT native to North America and, in their native range, there are lots of predators and their habitats in most ways are very similar to California's habitats, so they would definitely flourish in California, despite competition from rats and mice (in the hamster's native range in Africa and Eurasia, there are rats and mice which also already exist in California). The hamsters would likely outcompete some native small mammals to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

44 Capybara Capybara The capybara is the largest rodent in the world. It is a member of the genus Hydrochoerus, of which the only other extant member is the lesser capybara.

There are one or two sightings of capybaras in California, where they're not native to. If there are more than 2, probably more than 15 or so, that would be enough to allow capybaras to breed in California. Capybaras in South America can live in wide variety of swampy environments and can breed really fast, so capybaras have a chance to flourish and breed in California. They, however, would devastate some lands and would outcompete some native species to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

45 Nutria Nutria

Nutrias are highly invasive in most nonnative ranges. They were eradicated in California once, but that's because there were too few nutrias that were brought to California until humans trapped the nurtias. They would likely become invasive and spread out if enough nutrias were introduced to California, they would then be almost completely impossible to eradicate. They would have the same impact they have as in southeastern United States, where they are flourishing and are invasive. - DinoLover4242

46 Cobra (Snake) Cobra (Snake)

These snakes (including Egyptian cobras, Indian cobras, spitting cobras, king cobras, etc) would possibly become established in California as California has (in most ways) similar climates and habitats as the cobra's native range, and would become established if enough cobras escaped from zoos or if humans released them. They would probably severely impact some native small animals, leading them to possibly become endangered or extinct, and cobras would outcompete some populations of native rattlesnakes that aren't used to new competitors. - DinoLover4242

47 Brown Tree Snake Brown Tree Snake

Brown tree snakes are already invasive in most islands, including Hawaii, and they adapt really well in droughts and wet seasons. They would probably become established in California if humans released them into California's ecosystems, where they would severely impact some native small animal species. - DinoLover4242

48 Pacu Pacu

Pacus are already invasive in some nonnative areas, and somewhere in Indonesia, they are flourishing and there are reports there of pacus harming people as if they turned from vegetarians to flesh-eaters due to overconsumption of food in these areas. The pacus are likely to become invasive in California as people can brake laws without anyone else noticing and some people might have pacus in California and if some of these people don't want pacus anymore and released enough pacus into lakes and rivers of California, they would become invasive species, possibly killing off some natives, probably leading to them becoming flesh-eaters like in Indonesia. - DinoLover4242

49 Laughing Kookaburra Laughing Kookaburra

They were successfully introduced to Tasmania and New Zealand, where they are flourishing despite the fact that Tasmania and New Zealand getting colder than mainland Australia, and they adapts really well into urban areas and the suburbs. Because of this, laughing kookaburras would very likely become established in California if enough escaped or were released, they would have some impact towards some native small species. - DinoLover4242

50 Common Cuckoo Common Cuckoo

Common cuckoos are brood parasites and that may be a threat to natives of North America, including ones of California, as no native North American birds aren't used to nonnative common cuckoos. If common cuckoos had successfully established in California for example, common cuckoos would cause a decline to native birds by replace some of their young with common cuckoo young and using adapted bird parents as foster parents, leading some native birds chicks to starve and die of neglect if the adult bird cared more about the baby common cuckoo. - DinoLover4242

PSearch List
P