Plant and Animal Species that Would Be Invasive in Florida

DinoLover4242

The Top Ten

1 Nile Crocodile Nile Crocodile

If they were introduced into Florida, they could decimate some populations of alligators and native American crocodiles. - DinoLover4242

2 Green Anaconda Green Anaconda

This snake is likely to be successfully introduced to Florida if enough were released or escaped. If it occurs, they could kill off some native alligators and crocodiles. Some deer and bears could also be targets. This would be an even worse invader than Burmese pythons, not to mention that anacondas also give birth to live young, which is an advantage compared to the egg laying techniques of pythons since they're not exposed to egg eaters. - DinoLover4242

3 Hippo Hippo The common hippopotamus, or hippo, is a large, mostly herbivorous mammal in sub-Saharan Africa, and one of only two extant species in the family Hippopotamidae, the other being the pygmy hippopotamus.

There was a hippo bill that was meant to bring hippos to Florida as a replacement for cattle in early 1900s, if this bill was approved, the introduced hippos would overconsume many of the native plants, and since they're aggressive, could kill nearby intruders, including native alligators. - DinoLover4242

4 Chimpanzee Chimpanzee

These apes would consume native plants, they would also feed on agricultural plants, making nonnative chimpanzees in Florida a pets. They would also hunt and kill native smaller mammals, but would also kill some nonnative mammals including monkeys such as rhesus macaques. They also eat eggs, which would endanger some native birds and reptiles. - DinoLover4242

5 Orangutan Orangutan

Just like chimpanzees, these Asian apes would also overconsume some native plant species and would probably also be agricultural pests if they feed on farmed plants. - DinoLover4242

6 Gibbon Gibbon

These apes would overconsume native plants of Florida, as with every ape species, so they would also eat farm plants, which could potentially make them agricultural pests. - DinoLover4242

7 White-Faced Whistling Duck White-Faced Whistling Duck

These ducks are likely to establish breeding populations in Florida as there are sightings of white-faced whistling ducks, despite no evidence of breeding. If there are breeding populations of these waterfowls, they could potentially outcompete some native species of ducks and interbreeding with them. - DinoLover4242

8 African Bullfrog African Bullfrog

These frogs would outcompete some native species of aquatic animals and, since they mature much faster due to living in arid regions of Africa, would be able to outcompete some native populations of American bullfrogs to extinction. - DinoLover4242

9 Olive Baboon Olive Baboon Baboons are African and Arabian Old World monkeys belonging to the genus Papio, part of the subfamily Cercopithecinae.

These large monkeys could potentially hunt and kill native deer as how they do in Africa, where they can kill antelopes. They would also feed on smaller animals, eggs, and fruit that aren't used to nonnative baboons. - DinoLover4242

10 Mandrill Mandrill

Mandrills, the large jungle monkeys, would overconsume some native plant species to extinction and would outcompete some native herbivores. - DinoLover4242

The Contenders

11 Sheep Sheep The sheep is a quadrupedal, ruminant mammal typically kept as livestock. Like all ruminants, sheep are members of the order Artiodactyla, the even-toed ungulates.

Um, I'm pretty sure there are already sheep in Florida's wilderness (not just farmless), as in most parts of world nowadays. - DinoLover4242

12 Black Widow Spider Black Widow Spider
13 Coquerel's Sifaka Coquerel's Sifaka

This species of lemur becoming invasive in Florida may sound unlikely, but it's possible due to the fact that many (not all, though) zoos, safari parks, and sanctuaries in Florida have Coquerel's sifakas, and if enough Coquerel's sifakas escaped, they could establish breeding populations in Florida, where they could probably outcompete native squirrels and other omnivorous tree-dwelling animals to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

14 Ring-Tailed Lemur Ring-Tailed Lemur

This species of lemur becoming invasive in Florida may sound unlikely, but it's possible due to the fact that many (not all, though) zoos, safari parks, and sanctuaries in Florida have ring-tailed lemurs, and if enough ring-tailed lemurs escaped, they could establish breeding populations in Florida, where they could probably outcompete native squirrels and other omnivorous tree-dwelling animals to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

15 Red Ruffed Lemur Red Ruffed Lemur

This species of lemur becoming invasive in Florida may sound unlikely, but it's possible due to the fact that many (not all, though) zoos, safari parks, and sanctuaries in Florida have red ruffed lemurs, and if enough red ruffed lemurs escaped, they could establish breeding populations in Florida, where they could probably outcompete native squirrels and other omnivorous tree-dwelling animals to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

16 Black-And-White Ruffed Lemur Black-And-White Ruffed Lemur

This species of lemur becoming invasive in Florida may sound unlikely, but it's possible due to the fact that many (not all, though) zoos, safari parks, and sanctuaries in Florida have black-and-white ruffed lemurs, and if enough black-and-white ruffed lemurs escaped, they could establish breeding populations in Florida, where they could probably outcompete native squirrels and other omnivorous tree-dwelling animals to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

17 Aye-aye Aye-aye The aye-aye is a lemur, a strepsirrhine primate native to Madagascar that combines rodent-like teeth that perpetually grow and a special thin middle finger.

Aye-ayes are a yet-another unlikely but possible invasive species if let loose in Florida. If they were brought into Florida's ecosystem, they could devastate some native insect species and outcompete many native woodpecker species to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

18 Flying Fox Flying Fox

Flying foxes are already listed on the Lacey Act since people are worried that flying foxes would devastate agricultural crops by eating the crops. If this happened, that would probably be a disaster. They would probably also spread annoying and possibly deadly diseases and/or viruses if they were carrying them before being released into the new ecosystem. Imagine if flying foxes were successfully introduced to Florida and are flourishing (breeding, finding right food, etc) in Floridian wilderness, cities, and suburbs, that horrifying scenario would happen in this state. - DinoLover4242

19 Vampire Bat Vampire Bat

The common vampire bat is a potential invasive species that, if global warming trends continues in the future, would spread into Florida, spreading potential deadly diseases on livestock on many people, even if there are few diseased vampire bats. Southern Florida is the warmest part of Florida for now and would provide suitable habitats for vampire bats and would spread out if Florida continues to warm. - DinoLover4242

20 Small Asian Mongoose Small Asian Mongoose

They're already invasive in many islands such as Hawaii, so it's possible for small Asian mongooses to become invasive species if they were introduced to Florida as exotic pets and/or zoo/safari park escapees. They're already on the Lacey Act along with flying foxes, but some people can break some laws without other people noticing, so it's still possible for small Asian mongooses to be released in Florida to become invasive, eating eggs of native ground reptiles and birds, as well as preying on native reptiles, amphibians, and small mammals, possibly driving some endangered species to extinction. - DinoLover4242

21 Montezuma Oropendola Montezuma Oropendola

There was one report of the species of bird being found in Florida, but it was eradicated, but what if there were enough Montezuma oropendolas in Florida to establish successful breeding populations in Florida without the help of humans? They would outcompete some native species of birds, such as the near-endangered Florida scrub jays, to endangerment or extinction, as Montezuma oropendola also feeds on small vertebrates, insects, and plants, even feeding on bananas, so they would be viewed as conservation pests by Floridians and would also be an agricultural pest due to having banana in their diet. - DinoLover4242

22 Screaming Piha Screaming Piha

This may sound unlikely, but due to the environments of Florida being mostly warm and humid, these are likely suitable habitats for rainforest birds, including screaming pihas. If screaming pihas were introduced to Florida, they would outcompete some native birds to endangerment or extinction as screaming pihas feed on fruits (possibly also ones present in Florida) and insects (also probably also the ones in Florida too). - DinoLover4242

23 Capuchinbird Capuchinbird

Just like the screaming piha and the Montezuma oropendola, the capuchinbird may one day be introduced if enough capuchinbirds were released or had escaped from zoos and/or safari parks. Due to the fact that most of the habitats in Florida being very similar to the capuchinbird's native rainforest habitats, these birds would flourish and would outcompete some native species of birds to endangerment or extinction, as they feed on fruits and insects, probably also ones in Florida, both native and nonnative. - DinoLover4242

24 Superb Lyrebird Superb Lyrebird

This species of birds, native to mainland Australia, has already been introduced to Tasmania, where they flourish despite Tasmania being typically cooler than mainland Australia (in most ways), so they would likely do the same in Florida, where they would be invasive as their foraging behavior that changes structures on the forest floor would damage the environment in Florida, since there are no native birds with this behavior in Florida, and this would be bad news for some native birds, as lyrebirds eat the insects, possibly also native ones in Florida (probably also nonnative ones too). - DinoLover4242

25 Eastern Spinebill Eastern Spinebill

This Australian bird adapts really well in human settlements in native range, so there's no reason for them not adapting to human settlements in nonnative range, including Florida, which is becoming warmer due to climate change, and the fact that there are lots of gardens made by humans, which would provide nectar from plants for nonnative Australian spinebills. The spinebills would also eat the nectar of invasive plants, thus spreading the invasive plants even further, and the fact that spinebills feed on nectar, they would outcompete many native hummingbird species to endangerment or extinction due to the invasion of spinebills. - DinoLover4242

26 Wild Swan Goose Wild Swan Goose

These birds may be listed as Vulnerable in their native range, but these (pure) wild birds flourish well in nonnative Europe and is likely to become established in Florida due to frequent escapees being found outside of captivity. If enough wild swan geese escaped, they would likely have successful breeding populations in Florida, where they would probably outcompete some native waterfowls and interbreeding with domestic swan geese, erasing (possibly) all traces of domestication, making more wild swan geese and further competing against native species of ducks and geese for food. - DinoLover4242

27 Emu Emu The emu is the second-largest living bird by height, after its ratite relative, the ostrich. It is endemic to Australia where it is the largest native bird and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius.

Emus flourish really well even in cold climates in some farms, probably also breeding well there as well. If this is the case, emus would flourish well in Florida, but would threaten some native species, including wild turkeys, by competing them for insects and other small animals they feed on, as well as feeding on plants that some native species depend on. - DinoLover4242

28 Streaked Tenrec Streaked Tenrec

It may sound unlikely for this species to successfully establish breeding populations in Florida, but due to global warming causing Florida to warm up and humid habitats like gardens being built by humans, this increased the likelihood of streaked tenrecs being introduced successfully in Florida and breeding without any human help. But if that occurs, streaked tenrecs would likely kill off some native insects and earthworms to endangerment or extinction as streaked tenrecs feed on insects and earthworms. - DinoLover4242

29 Guinea Pig Guinea Pig The guinea pig, also called the cavy or domestic guinea pig, is a species of rodent belonging to the family Caviidae and the genus Cavia.

There are lots of guinea pigs, a group of medium-sized tailless rodents, as pets throughout Florida, so it is possible for some people not wanting guinea pigs anymore and release them into the wilderness, thus making guinea pigs possibly invasive species, after they adapt to native predators, and rodents of most kinds breed really fast, so the guinea pigs would have enough time to adapt to Florida's ecosystem. They, however, would outcompete some native small mammals. - DinoLover4242

30 hedgehog hedgehog A hedgehog is any of the spiny mammals of the subfamily Erinaceinae, in the eulipotyphlan family Erinaceidae.

These animals would likely be released into Florida by some people who don't want to sell or give away their unwanted hedgehogs to other people. If breeding populations of hedgehogs are successful, they would outcompete some native species found in Florida and would prey on some native species, such as some endangered native earthworms, to endangerment or extinction. - DinoLover4242

31 Komodo Dragon Komodo Dragon The Komodo dragon, also known as the Komodo monitor, is a large species of lizard found in the Indonesian islands of Komodo, Rinca, Flores, Gili Motang, and Padar.

Komodo dragons do really well even with (most) invasive species in its native range, and since Florida has similar climate and (most) habitats, Komodo dragons would flourish really well in most parts of Florida. Komodo dragons would be a threat to not only Florida's farmed livestock, but also to native deer and such, probably making some endangered or even extinct, so it's a risk to introduce Komodo dragons into Florida, where they would most likely become invasive species. - DinoLover4242

32 Australian Magpie Australian Magpie

These birds, which aren't magpies or even corvids (despite their names), but part of a completely different group of passerine birds, would be highly invasive if they were introduced to Florida. Australian magpies do really well in nonnative New Zealand, where they displaced some native birds and tolerate colder temperatures, so this proves that Australian magpies would flourish really well in Florida too. - DinoLover4242

33 Brown Tree Snake Brown Tree Snake

Brown tree snakes are already invasive in most islands, including Hawaii, and they adapt really well in droughts and wet seasons. They would probably become established in Florida if humans released them into Florida's ecosystems, where they would severely impact some native small animal species. - DinoLover4242

34 Cobra (Snake) Cobra (Snake)

These snakes (including Egyptian cobras, Indian cobras, spitting cobras, king cobras, etc) would possibly become established in Florida as Florida has (in most ways) similar climates and habitats as the cobra's native range, and would become established if enough cobras escaped from zoos or if humans released them. They would probably severely impact some native small animals, leading them to possibly become endangered or extinct, and cobras would outcompete some populations of native cottonmouths and other native venomous snakes that aren't used to new competitors. - DinoLover4242

35 Laughing Kookaburra Laughing Kookaburra

They were successfully introduced to Tasmania and New Zealand, where they are flourishing despite the fact that Tasmania and New Zealand getting colder than mainland Australia, and they adapt really well into urban areas and the suburbs. Because of this, laughing kookaburras would very likely become established in Florida if enough escaped or were released, they would have some impact towards some native small species. - DinoLover4242

36 Pacu Pacu

Pacus are already invasive in some nonnative areas, and somewhere in Indonesia, they are flourishing and there are reports there of pacus harming people as if they turned from vegetarians to flesh-eaters due to overconsumption of food in these areas. The pacus are likely to become invasive in Florida as people can break laws without anyone else noticing and some people might have pacus in Florida and if some of these people don't want pacus anymore and released enough pacus into lakes and rivers of Florida, they would become invasive species, possibly killing off some natives, probably leading to them becoming flesh-eaters like in Indonesia. - DinoLover4242

37 Piranha Piranha A piranha or piraƱa, a member of family Characidae in order Characiformes, is a freshwater fish that inhabits South American rivers, floodplains, lakes and reservoirs.

These fish, which are normally harmless vegetarian, if they were introduced to Florida's waterways, would outcompete some native fish species and would devastate some local ecosystems in the waterways. They have been reported in some waterways of Florida, being able to tolerate the cold for some odd reasons (despite being tropical fish), they can also breed really well, and there are lawbreakers (despite laws being enacted to prevent keeping piranhas as pets in Florida), which increases the chance of piranhas being successfully brought to Florida. - DinoLover4242

38 Hammer-Headed Bat Hammer-Headed Bat

It may sound unlikely, but due to the fact that Florida is warming up due to climate change and the fact that there are lots of gardens and vegetation planted by people, including ones that are feral and even invasive in some, this is increasing the chance that hammer-headed bats could potentially establish breeding populations in Florida (if escaped from zoos they came from), where they would outcompete some native species and would be a nuisance to humans, damaging man-made structures, etc. - DinoLover4242

39 Asian Giant Hornet Asian Giant Hornet

People are already concerned about these large predatory insects, which are native to Southeast Asia, but has since been introduced to Europe, where they are devastating native bees there. If these insects were successfully introduced to Florida, they would also be a threat to the bees there, but would also be a danger to humans too, as these hornets can deliver very painful stings and sometimes can lead to death, especially if that person is either allergic to hornet stings or the venom of the hornets who stung that person is potent. - DinoLover4242

40 Coqui Coqui

This is an invasive species, but this species already was introduced to Florida, so try adding some other species that aren't found in Florida, but could potentially devastate some Florida habitats/economy. - DinoLover4242

41 Koala Koala The koala is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae and its closest living relatives are the wombats.

The Koalas can invade Florida, either by decree of the government to have the race more than Australia, there are places belonging to Florida and Canada where they can be installed there but they can damage the ecology as it happened through Springfield.

Could you explain how would koalas become invasive in Florida? I'm just curious. - DinoLover4242

42 Common Warthog Common Warthog

Warthogs have recently been confirmed to be roaming and breeding in Texas, so it is possible for warthogs to adapt and flourish in Florida. Just like in Texas, warthogs would have some impact towards some native wildlife and would also devastate some crops. - DinoLover4242

43 Common Boa Common Boa
44 Red Panda Red Panda The red panda (Ailurus fulgens), or also known as the red bear-cat or the red cat-bear, is a mammal native to the Eastern Himalayas and Southwestern China. Despite having the word "panda" in its name, it's not a panda. It's closely related to raccoons
45 Goliath Birdeater Goliath Birdeater
46 Owls Owls

There are native species of owls of Florida, so this does NOT belong to the list, unless you are referring to nonnative owl species. - DinoLover4242

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